July 11, 2017

Last week, I participated in a seminar exploring how best to bring together health and planning to ‘improve the quality of lives and places in England’.  The focus was on putting theory into practice and/but a lot of the discussion was about language and evidence as barriers to this. In particular – and this is

May 21, 2017

If you ask individuals what ‘sense of place’ means to them, they offer up thoughts like ‘it’s the people’, ‘a place with history’, ‘a place I feel connected to’, as well as ‘sights, sounds and smells.’ The academic literature supports this. For example, we know that ‘place attachment’, which is the psychological term, is good